Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Housed in the Culinary School of Korea History and Culture in Gyeongju, the Laseonjae restaurant serves unique culinary delights that recreate the cuisine served in the royal courts of the Silla Kingdom. The school has a well-established reputation as a culinary institution that excels in preserving the taste and cooking styles of the past. Laseonjae was opened with the goal of promoting Isageum, the Silla-style course meal that the school developed after many years of research.The Isageum table consists of various dishes served in the royal court of Silla: the dishes are made of 9 rare, medicinal ingredients called gujinmi. The interior of Raseonjae is decorated mostly in gold, the color that defines the Silla Kingdom. Note the columns with lotus leaf patterns and other characteristics unique to banquet halls from the Silla royal court. The restaurant staff further portrays the splendor of the era by wearing traditional Shilla dress, seemingly transporting diners back in time while they enjoy an elegant and delicious meal experience.* Silla Isageum- Appetizer: good for the stomach and kidney- Main dish: good for the lung and liver- Dessert: good for the heart 


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Bulguksa Temple is the representative relic of Gyeongju and was designated as a World Cultural Asset by UNESCO in 1995. The beauty of the temple itself and the artistic touch of the stone relics are known throughout the world.Bulguksa Temple was built in 528 during the Silla Kingdom, in the 15th year of King Beop-Heung's reign (514-540). The temple was originally called ‘Hwaeom Bulguksa Temple’ or ‘Beopryusa Temple’ and was rebuilt by Kim Dae-Seong (700-774), who started rebuilding the temple in 751 during the reign of King Gyeong-Deok (r. 742-765) and completed it in 774 during the reign of King Hye-Gong (r. 765-780). Upon completion, the temple’s name was changed to Bulguksa.Bulguksa Temple underwent numerous renovations from the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) to the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), but was burned down during the Imjin War (Japanese Invasions, 1592-1598).Reconstruction started again in 1604 during the 37th year of King Seon-jo’s reign (Joseon Dynasty) and was renovated about 40 times until 1805 (during the reign of King Sun-Jo, 1790-1834). After this time, the temple suffered serious damage and was often the target of robbers.In 1969, the Bulguksa Temple Restoration Committee was formed and in 1973, Mulseoljeon, Gwaneumjeon, Birojeon, Gyeongru, and Hoerang (all of which had previously been demolished) were rebuilt. Other old or broken sites (such as Daeungjeon, Geungnakjeon, Beomyeongnu and Jahamun) were repaired.Even today, Bulguksa Temple is home to many important cultural relics such as Dabotap Pagoda (National Treasure No. 20), Seokgatap Pagoda (National Treasure No. 21) Yeonhwa-gyo & Chilbo-gyo Bridges (National Treasure No. 22), Cheongun-gyo & Baegun-gyo Bridges (National Treasure No. 23), the Golden Seated Vairocana Buddhist Figure (National Treasure No. 26), the Golden Seated Amita Figure (National Treasure No. 27), and Saritap Pagoda (Treasure No. 61).


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Gyeongju World Culture Expo is a valuable cultural exposition which has attracted over 16.2 million visitors so far through eight runs since 1998. In particular, previous expos introduced: the harmony of traditional culture and ICT (Information and Communications Technology), Korean culture and global culture, abundant hallyu contents, and is the first cultural expo to showcase the theme of the Silk Road. The expo is expected to welcome visitors with various exhibitions, performances, and hands-on programs.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Gyeongju National Museum is steeped in tradition. Representing Gyeongju, which was the capital city of the Silla Kingdom (57 BC - AD 935), the museum is where you can view the cultural history of Gyeongju district. Exhibitions are divided into 4 large areas: the Main hall, Annex I, Annex II, and the Outdoor Exhibit Area (Museum Grounds).In the Main Hall you can see earthenware, with various artworks and craftworks in the Arts and Crafts room. Gukeun Memorial Hall exhibits over 600 artifacts, which were the personal collection of Dr. Lee Yang-Seon, donated to the museum for preservation. Artifacts from the great tombs of the city of Gyeongju are displayed in the Gobun Gallery in Annex I. There are many glittering accessories, such as golden crowns and ornaments, belts, earrings, etc. You will be introduced to the superb artistry of the Silla Period through these artifacts.Approximately 30,000 artifacts have been excavated from Wolji Pond, the most significant of which are exhibited in the Wonji Gallery in Annex 2. Other galleries in Annex 2 exhibit household goods. These various types of items show many aspects of life in the Royal Court during the Silla Period. After the galleries, you can move on to the Outdoor Exhibit Area, in the Museum Grounds. King Seongdeok’s Bell, located here, is the most renowned of all Buddhist temple bells. You cannot help but feel solemn as you gaze upon the relic. There is also a variety of artifacts from royal palaces and temples exhibited throughout the grounds. Buddhist sculptures make up the majority of the stone artifacts. If you are a traveler interested in Buddhism or the magnificent culture of royal palaces, this is a place you do not want to miss.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Andong-si)

Hahoe Mask Museum is located in Andong Hahoe Village, which is both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Important Folklore Material No. 122. Hahoe Village is a representative traditional Korean folk town and is the home of the Hahoe Mask (National Treasure No. 121) and the Byeolsin Gut Mask Dance (Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 69). The museum not only displays Hahoe masks, but also other traditional masks from all over the world. The museum consists of a 1-story main building, a two-story annex building, an outdoor event garden, and a research room. The research room houses a wide range of books, documents, and video-audio materials related to masks. At the museum, you’ll encounter time-honored Korean masks that have long since been used in a variety of traditional mask dances. Masks include Bongsan, Gangnyeong, and Eunnyul masks from Hwanghae-do province; Sandaenori masks (Yeongju Byeolsandae and Songpa Sandaenori) from Seoul; Yaryu (Dongrae Yaryu, and Suyeong Yaryu masks) and Ogwangdae (Goseong Ogwangdae, Gasan Ogwangdae, Tongyeong Ogwangdae masks) from the Yeongnam region; Hahoe masks from Andong; Yeonghae Byeolsin Gut masks; Yeonggwang Nongakjapsaek masks; Yecheon Cheongdan Noreum masks; the Gangneung Gwanno Mask of the Gangneung Dano Festival; the Deotboegi mask of Namsadang nori; and Cheoyong, Bangsangssi ceremonial masks.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Gyeongju Bird Park offers a unique experience for visitors, just like entering a big birdcage. Guests can touch birds in person and play with them, not just looking at birds inside a cage. The park is designed to give convenience for both birds and visitors. Gyeongju Bird Park, Korean’s first experiential park featuring flowers and birds alike, is comprised of two floors; the entire first floor is an ecology experience hall that houses 90% of bird and other creatures such as reptiles, fish, and small animals. The second floor consists of exhibitions and experiential hall with outdoor hands-on experience site. The bird park is registered as Gyeongsangbuk-do's top museum and specialized animal park, so it can import and exhibit international rare animal species.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

The Gyeongju Historic Area, registered as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage on November 2000, is an area that embodies the time-honored history and culture of Gyeongju, the ancient capital of the Silla Kingdom (新羅, 57-935)The Gyeongju Historic Area can be divided into 5 major sections.The first section is the Namsan Area, a treasure trove of Buddhist art masterpieces dating back to the Silla Kingdom. Gyeongju Namsan Mountain (often referred to as an ‘outdoor museum’) is home to many historical heritage sites from the Silla Kingdom. Major attractions include: Poseokjeong (Historic Site No.1), Tapgok Maaejosanggun (Treasure No. 201), Cheollyongsaji Three-story Stone Pagoda (Treasure No. 1188), Chilbulam Maae Stone Buddha (Treasure No. 200), Bulgok Seated Stone Buddha (Treasure No. 198), and 37 other Buddhist relicsThe second section is the Wolseong Area, one of the former palace sites of the Silla Kingdom. The area consists of Gyerim (Historic Site No. 19); Imhaejeonji (Historic Site No. 18), a Silla Royal Palace site; and Cheomseongdae (National Treasure No. 31), the oldest observatory in the East. Daereungwon area, the third area, features a cluster of the royal graves of the Kings and Queens of Silla.Also in the same area are Gobungun (a cluster of old graves) in Nodong-ri (Historic Site No. 38), Gobungun (a cluster of old graves) in Noseo-ri (Historic Site No. 39) Gobungun (a cluster of old graves) in Hwangnam-ri (Historic Site No. 40), and Oreung (Historic Site No. 172), among others. Archaeologists have discovered a number of invaluable relics and historic items in this area such as Geumgwan (golden crown), Cheonmado (a painting of flying horses), and numerous pottery pieces. These finds are perhaps the greatest clues into the life of the people of the Silla Dynasty.Area number four, the Hwangnyongsa Area, is where the former site of the Hwangnyongsa Temple (Historic Site No. 246) and Bunhwangsa Stone Pagoda are located. Lastly, is the Sanseong Area, housing remnants of the major defense system for the capital city. The site consists of Myeonghwalsanseong Fortress (Historic Site No. 47) which is estimated to be around 400 years old.The Gyeongju Historic Area has a total of 52 designated cultural assets that are registered as World Cultural Heritages. 


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Gyeongju-si)

Seongdong Market, situated in Gyeongju-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, opened in 1971 and is comprised of around 300 stores and 30 street vendors. The market is on the opposite side of Gyeongju Station to the east.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Mungyeong-si)

The Mungyeongsaejae KBS Drama Studio was built by the Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) in 2000 in Yongsagol to film a historical drama about the Goryeo Period. The spacious studio (65,755m2) consisted of two large palaces, 42 tile-roofed houses, 40 thatched houses, and 13 additional buildings. It is the world’s largest historical drama film set.The studio was built in Mungyeongsaejae because its mountains (Joryeongsan and Juheulsan) resemble Songaksan in Gaeseong (the capital of the Goryeo Period) and the area is filled with numerous traditional roads. Major dramas and films shot at the studio include Taejo Wang Geon, the Dawn of the Empire, the Age of Warriors, Dae Jo Yeong, Scandal, and Romantic Assassin.In 2008 the studio was expanded and now covers 70,000m2 and has over 130 buildings representing structures from the Joseon Period, including palaces, houses lived in by the nobles, tile-roofed houses, and thatched houses.


Gyeongsangbuk-do(Andong-si)

The mask play of Hahoe Byeolsingut Exorcism itself, performed first by merchants in Andong Hahoe Village around mid 12th century is designated as Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 69. Hahoe Village, a clan village of the Pungsan Ryu family, preserves the traditional Korean way of life. The entire village has been designated as Important Folklore Material No.122. The mask dance performance has been performed to wish for much happiness and a good harvest for the village. Event Programs: Byeolsingut Exorcism means an unusual and uncommon form of exorcism. In an agricultural society, a good harvest was considered to be the key factor of the village’s survival and the villages performed a sacrificial rite to pray to the heavens for an ever-lasting and bountiful harvest. As an act of incantation, the mask dance is made up of 10 episodes with a satirical story of former nobleman. The 10 episodes include: the ‘Gang Shin Episode’ (an invocatory rite of a would-be medium), the ‘Mudong Episode’ (the doll bride enters the stage), the ‘Juji Episode’ (Juji is an imaginary animal), the ‘Butcher Episode’ (a character butchers a cow without any hesitation), the ‘Granny Episode’ (the sorrow and joy of the lives of the public can be felt), the ‘Depraved Monk Episode’ (it satirizes the depraved monks and Buddhism at the end of the Goryeo dynasty), the ‘Nobleman Episode’ (it satirizes the hypocrisy and affectation of former noblemen), the ‘Dang Je’ (a ritual service for putting God back in his first place), the ‘Wedding Episode’ (the doll bride and the scholar marry) and the ‘Bridal Room Episode’ (describing their honeymoon).